Friday, June 22, 2012

Writer's Digest Tutorials


WRITER'S DIGESTWriters DigestTUTORIALS
For ahicks4298@q.comJune 22, 2012
In This Issue
From the Editor
Editing our own writing isn't always easy; in fact, it can be extremely hard. However, after working on this week's new tutorial—I can honestly tell you that I have a new inspiration for editing. I love this week's featured tutorial as it provides concrete, easy-to-follow methods that are sure to improve your writing.

It's critical that your writing is the best it can be before you submit to any editor or agent. After watching to How to Become a Ferocious Self-Editor, you will have countless ideas on how to better your own writing.  


Example: He squinted his eyes as he looked up into the sky. 

Ask yourself: What can be taken out of this sentence? 

Answer: First, what else but his eyes would he squint? Second, we all know the sky is up, why state that? 

Quick re-write: He squinted as he looked into the sky.  


At the very least, please make time to watch the short preview clip of today's featured tutorial. You are sure to pick up tips by merely watching the preview—and you'll gain a vast amount of knowledge by watching the entire tutorial. Remember that with tutorials, you can watch on your own time—when it's convenience for you. You can also pause and replay as many times as you'd like. I'd highly recommend taking out a WD Tutorials membership if you haven't already. Please also feel free to preview the many tutorials available to you through the WD Tutorials site!  

Wishing you only the best!
Julie Oblander
Online Education Manager
Writer's Digest Tutorials

Featured Tutorial: How to Become a Ferocious Self-Editor
Even though the vehicles that carry your writing to the market are changing every minute—whether you're Tweeting, blogging, submitting to online/print publications, pitching conventional publishers or planning to self-publish—the cream still rises to the top. Your writing has to be edited and rewritten until it shines.

The competition has never been tougher, and that's why it's important your work is vigorously self-edited and revised before you ever submit to editors or agents. Learning to edit and rewrite your own text is more crucial than ever. 

This tutorial will give you the tools to fashion your writing to where it's a cut above the competition. You'll see, with examples of pages on screen, how to wrestle every sentence into submission. 

Instructor Jerry B. Jenkins is a New York Times best-selling novelist and biographer with more than 70 million books sold. He is the co-creator of the Left Behind series. His writing has appeared in TimeReader's DigestParadeGuideposts, and many other periodicals. He has been featured on the cover of Newsweek and Writer's Digest

In this 84-minute tutorial video, you'll learn:
  • How to make every word count 
  • Secrets of dialogue attribution, including the latest trends 
  • How to avoid clich├ęs, including more than words or phrases—catching hackneyed situations and scenes 
  • How to avoid throat-clearing and get quickly to your point 
  • The importance of maintaining a single point of view 
  • How to resist the urge to explain, giving the reader credit 
  • How to make your writing irresistible to an editor
Preview this new tutorial or subscribe to watch it today >
Missed a previous tutorial? Try one of these . . .
A new tutorial is added every week at Writer's Digest Tutorials. Don't miss out!Subscribe today OR download tutorials individually through the Writer's Digest Shop.


How Do I Revise?
eBook (PDF)
Sale: $5.99
Buy Now >

Writing
Basics
Sale: $2.00
Buy Now >
Fiction: Revision
& Self-Editing
Sale: $9.34
Buy Now >

Getting the
Words Right
Sale: $10.67
Buy Now >

Live Webinar | Writing the Breakout Teen Novel
There's still time to register and attend! 
Session date: Thursday, June 21, 2012
Starting time: 1:00 p.m. EDT
Duration: 90 minutes 

Anyone can tell you that the YA (young adult) publishing industry is hot, with new debut authors getting deals each week. But with this market success comes more competition than ever. So what can you do to stand out? "Writing the Breakout Teen Novel" will give you a literary agent's insider insight to what's in, what's out, and what you can expect along the road to publication in this exciting and booming segment of the publishing marketplace.

From establishing a knowledge base of the category, to crafting that perfect concept and fine-tuning your voice, to researching smarter and refining your querying strategies, literary agent Holly Root will give you an agent's eye view of the current YA landscape—with plenty of straight talk about what's real, what's hype, and how to thrive in one of the most exciting areas of the publishing business. 

This webinar includes a critique from literary agent Holly Root! All registrants are invited to submit a one-page query letter for their novel. Take advantage of this rare opportunity to learn from and get your query letter in front of an agent!  

Learn More or Register Today >

Writer's Digest Tutorials Membership Options
1-Month Full-Library Subscription
Want to try us out? Buy a 1-month membership and receive access to our entire collection.Subscribe Now >6-Month Full-Library Subscription
Purchase a membership to all of our videos for 6 months and watch them whenever you'd like. Subscribe Now >
12-Month Full-Library Subscription -- Best Value!
Get access to all of our writing workshops for an entire year. Watch every video whenever you like and as often as you would like and be the first to watch the new tutorial we post each week. Subscribe Now >

SURVEY - Your opinion is wanted and valued!
Your opinion is highly valued—and I truly mean that. If you would take a few minutes to complete a quick survey (it's only 10 questions long!), I would greatly appreciate it.

I will personally take the time to read each and every response and will take all into consideration. This survey will help me plan out future months of tutorials and newsletter content—and will allow me to bring you what YOU want to read and watch. 

This survey will let you provide input regarding the WD Tutorials Site and the WD Tutorials Newsletter. If you'd like to refer to the page where you can see ALL tutorials that are currently available, use this link: View All WD Tutorials > 

I sincerely thank you for taking the time to fill out the survey! 

~ Julie ~

Screenwriters Newsletter

Hello, everyone.

I am thinking about starting a monthly newsletter for writers and of novels and screenplays. I would like some feedback from my faithful blog followers on what you would like to read in such a news letter. I plan for it to be free.

Please send your feedback.



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Monday, June 18, 2012

Screenwriting: Qualities needed to Write

Make no mistake: hard work is the secret of becoming a great writer, and successful gifted people work at least as hard as anyone else — probably much harder. In fact, I have come to believe the definition of “talent” is:  an unusually high capacity for learning, focus, and hard work, and being able to envision perfection, strive for it, and know you will never achieve it — but being willing to die trying. By way of example, the great dancer Fred Astaire — who was certainly naturally gifted — worked harder at rehearsing than anybody, even when he was long past his physical prime.
But the fact that anyone who wants to make it in any field of the arts has to study and work very hard, doesn’t mean that people who have inherent gifts don’t start out with a “leg up” on others if — and only if — they put in the time and effort. A non-gifted writer may, with hard work, have a viable career. But he might also have a “ceiling” to how good his work can ultimately become. For a gifted writer who works just as hard, the sky’s the limit. It is not difficult for someone who does what I do for a living to spot this kind of talent, even, sometimes, in a first draft of a first script. When I see it, I make sure the writer knows this and give him (or her) every possible encouragement.      
When it comes to being a screenwriter, you can’t change whether you were “born this way” or not. If you weren’t, this doesn’t mean you can’t learn how to write and are doomed to failure. I can tell you the characteristics I’ve observed in screenwriters who are “born this way,” and you can learn from them, even if you weren’t.
TEN QUALITIES OF SCREENWRITERS WHO ARE “BORN THIS WAY”:
1)   They have tremendous focus and self-discipline and absorb information like a sponge. They have a great capacity for learning from what others do, say, or write, and assimilating that information so that they can apply it to their own work in a unique way.
2)   Their only goal is to make their work better. They are not completely “crushed” by rejections and criticism, but instead learn from them and rewrite. They have insecurities, but are not destroyed by them. They are total perfectionists, but not to the point of emotional paralysis. They do a great job rewriting their scripts based on “notes” and suggestions they get from others, and know good (and bad) advice when they hear it. Their scripts come out pretty much “pared to the bone” —  even on the first draft — because they planned them so well before beginning to write.  Their storytelling is efficient.
3)   Their action lines have a crisp, succinct, pithy, and vivid, visually evocative quality to them.  There’s a very clear, distinctive, and efficient style or “voice” in the way they write. It is their natural voice; it is not faked.It’s neither too “cute” nor too “dry.” If they are not funny, they don’t try to be funny. The script is “a great read.”
4)   It’s clear they did their research, but they didn’t get bogged-down in it or stick slavishly to historical fact. 
5)   Every aspect of what they write shows their diligence. Nothing about their work is lazy or sloppy. They have bothered to learn the correct way to do things. A writer who has taken the time to do research, plan his story before writing it, make sure his script is in the correct format, has the right number of brads, and has very few, if any, typos, is more likely to have applied the same diligence to learning his craft as a screenwriter.
6)   They love movies and know the history of movies. They have studied them and learned their lessons. They know their genre.
7)   They know what a conflict is, and they know what a story is. The basic concept for their story works, and it is very, very simple.
8)   Their style is unique. Their characters are unique. They don’t try to write “unique plots” (which don’t exist anyway) but rather are unique in the way they execute their stories and characters.
9)    Their primary goal is to write the story they are passionate about because it would make a good movie,rather than just because it is their personal “issue” or “message,” or because they were thinking, “How can I make a million dollars in a hurry?”  They write from the heart, with insight into human nature, and an honest vision of what they know about life. 
10)   They know how real people tend to react and behave in real situations and apply this to their characters. They know what’s credible and realistic when creating their plot and what audiences will believe. They anticipate the questions the audience will be asking, and answer them in the story. They know how audiences will feel and respond emotionally to what they’re seeing at any given moment in the movie and which characters they will be rooting for, and they are in command of creating, manipulating, and controlling that reaction in ways that don’t seem contrived.

Keep in mind I know some very gifted screenwriters who don’t make it because they lack the other qualities successful writers need:  persistence, a collaborative attitude (charm and being open to suggestions certainly helps) but not being wishy-washy, a reasonable degree of emotional stability, a willingness to learn how to market their work, a combination of core self-confidence and manageable insecurities, and a strong work ethic with the ability to follow through on and meet responsibilities and deadlines.

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Go forward and win!




Logline Service
I have been getting a lot of request for loglines. I give different prices . Since I have so many requests for this service, I decided to set a single fix price.

Logline: $5.00 Flat Fee

A synopsis or summery is required. It well be used to form the logline. The logline is just one line.

The 15% discount on Critiques will continue through June


Screenplays

Critique: $50.00 Flat Fee, Discount fee $42.50
 Includes evaluating the basis elements of a script

  •  Introduction
  •  Development
  •  Climax
  •  Conclusion
  • Character development 
  •  Mid point development
Critiques also provide suggestions for improvements and enhancement. 

Payments are made by Paypal or cashier check by mail.


Other services are at regular price.

Query Letters: $25.00 Flat Fee  

Editing: $45.00 Flat Fee
  •  Evaluating formatting to industry standards
  •  Spelling, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, etc.
Turnaround time:
Editing: 2 weeks
Critique: 2 weeks
Query Letters: 2 weeks

Feel free to contact me at ahicks4298@q.com or ahicks4298@msn.com.
Feel to call me at (360) 696-4298. Ask for Frances.


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Monday, June 11, 2012

5 Tips To Help Avoid Writer’s Block



Starting a new writing project is always SO exciting whether you’re just writing a script to sell or your next low-budget classic. There is so much enthusiasm flowing through you as ideas race through your mind – Great One-liners, Awesome Action Sequences, and Groovy Set Pieces. You think to yourself that this script is going to practically write it’s self you have so many ideas until… SCREECH! You suddenly find yourself staring at a BLANK PAGE with nowhere to go; you’ve just hit the Writer’s Wall!

This article is designed to give you some helpful tips and writing preparations that will hopefully allow you to figure out all of your problems before you start writing so you can avoid the pesky Writer’s Block and all the problems it can cause to your mental health and script.

1. Watch Movies That Are Similar To Your Movie
The first step to helping you avoid writer’s block is to admit and come to terms with the fact: ORIGINALITY IS DEAD. Truth is, once you do this, writing your script will already become infinitely easier, so good job! Next go to your local video store and rent 5-10 movies that are similar in story and structure to your idea or logline.

Now watch the movies you’ve rented and study them! Watching movies similar to your script will help you see how the story works, what moves the scenes and story forward, how characters achieve their goals and overcome their quirks. I know to some this will seem not creative but this is how many professionals do it, and trust me every story has already been told so what your goal should be is to find a way to tell it differently or better. DON’T TRY AND REINVENT THE WHEEL!

2. Reverse Engineer Your Script
You wouldn’t build a car without knowing how it should look at the end; well the same rule applies with screenwriting. Know how you want the story to end – What should your main character achieve? What will have they overcomer? What have they learned? What happens to their surrounding environment (if applicable)? By answering this question it will give you, the writer, a goal to work towards and more knowledge about what parts and conflicts you’ll need to include in your script in order to get you character and story to the finish line. This same technique also works for writing each individual scene?!

3. Outline Your Movie
Every movie consists roughly of 35-40 scenes, so to properly outline your movie you should have at least 35 different bullet points/scenes in your outline. Now everyone has their own approach to outlining, but what I find effective is to write only 1-2, certainly no more than 3 sentences describing the action and goal of each scene. Then once I have my whole movie worked out in very broad strokes I go back and re-outline the entire movie, but this time filling in all the fun details, one liners, funny gags, and action sequences that I have in my head. If you do this I can guarantee you will have a solid story and a way easier time writing your first draft, because it’s way easier to fix problems in the prep stage then when you’re already half-way through your script.

4. Know Your Main Character
Before you start writing figure out who your Main Character is – What kind of quirks does he/she have? What do they look like? Have a great mental image in your head of what they look like, this will help you write more believable actions and dialogue for your character.

If you don’t have ideas for who or what your main character should look and act like, try looking at famous character archetypes that already exist and ask yourself – Is he/she the smart but clumsy kid? Are they the hunk? Or are they the warrior seeking revenge? Make sure you ask all these questions and really figure out who fits best for your idea, because by doing this it will not only help you with your writing but it will also allow you to be able to move faster.

5. Give Your Character Flaws And Goals
Creating Flaws and Goals for your main character can be one of the most difficult tasks, but if you can figure these two things out before you start writing it can help you avoid a collision with the dreaded Writer’s Wall. By having defined flaws and goals it helps set-up your character and their arc; it also gives your character problems that need to be fixed in order for them to achieve their goal, which allows you, as a writer, to keep your script focused and clean.

Well that’s it for this post! I hope it helps you to avoid Writer’s Block or any snags you may encounter during the writing process. Remember the more prep you do before you start writing the better off you’re going to be. So before you start your next script be sure to:


  • Watch Movies That Are Similar To Your Movie 
  • Reverse Engineer Your Script, Outline Your Movie 
  • Outline Your Movie 
  • Know Your Main Character 
  • Give Your Character Flaws And Goals. 

As always if you have any tips or tricks that you do to help avoid a collision with Writer’s Block be sure and leave a comment below, we would love to hear what works for you!


****************************************************************

Go forward and win!



Logline Service
I have been getting a lot of request for loglines. I give different prices . Since I have so many requests for this service, I decided to set a single fix price.

Logline: $5.00 Flat Fee

A synopsis or summery is required. It well be used to form the logline. The logline is just one line.

The 15% discount on Critiques will continue through June


Screenplays

Critique: $50.00 Flat Fee, Discount fee $42.50
 Includes evaluating the basis elements of a script

  •  Introduction
  •  Development
  •  Climax
  •  Conclusion
  • Character development 
  •  Mid point development
Critiques also provide suggestions for improvements and enhancement. 

Payments are made by Paypal or cashier check by mail.


Other services are at regular price.

Query Letters: $25.00 Flat Fee  

Editing: $45.00 Flat Fee
  •  Evaluating formatting to industry standards
  •  Spelling, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, etc.
Turnaround time:
Editing: 2 weeks
Critique: 2 weeks
Query Letters: 2 weeks

Feel free to contact me at ahicks4298@q.com or ahicks4298@msn.com.
Feel to call me at (360) 696-4298. Ask for Frances.


************************************************************************************
Film script format, writing film scripts, screenwriting services, coverage service, screenplay formatting margins, screenplay writing, screenplay format example, Search terms: screenplays, screenwriting service, edit and critique service, writing screenplays, screenplay format, loglines, query letter, film scripts, movie scripts, screenplay format, screenplay synopsis, script synopsis, treatment, proofreading service for writers, novels, writing services, fiction writing, film script format, writing flim scripts, screenwriting service, coverage service, screenplay critique service, screenplay format margins, screenplay writing, screenplay format example, free writing tutorials,   script consultant, screenwriting jobs, film production companies

Friday, June 8, 2012

Any Questions About Writing?

Hi, everyone.

Do you have a question about writing? Feel free to send it to me in the comment box. I will reply.

Happy writing!



*******************************************************************************

Go forward and win!


Logline Service
I have been getting a lot of request for loglines. I give different prices . Since I have so many requests for this service, I decided to set a single fix price.

Logline: $5.00 Flat Fee

A synopsis or summery is required. It well be used to form the logline. The logline is just one line.

The 15% discount on Critiques will continue through June


Screenplays

Critique: $50.00 Flat Fee, Discount fee $42.50
 Includes evaluating the basis elements of a script

  •  Introduction
  •  Development
  •  Climax
  •  Conclusion
  • Character development 
  •  Mid point development
Critiques also provide suggestions for improvements and enhancement. 

Payments are made by Paypal or cashier check by mail.


Other services are at regular price.

Query Letters: $25.00 Flat Fee  

Editing: $45.00 Flat Fee
  •  Evaluating formatting to industry standards
  •  Spelling, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, etc.
Turnaround time:
Editing: 2 weeks
Critique: 2 weeks
Query Letters: 2 weeks

Feel free to contact me at ahicks4298@q.com or ahicks4298@msn.com.
Feel to call me at (360) 696-4298. Ask for Frances.


************************************************************************************
Film script format, writing film scripts, screenwriting services, coverage service, screenplay formatting margins, screenplay writing, screenplay format example, Search terms: screenplays, screenwriting service, edit and critique service, writing screenplays, screenplay format, loglines, query letter, film scripts, movie scripts, screenplay format, screenplay synopsis, script synopsis, treatment, proofreading service for writers, novels, writing services, fiction writing, film script format, writing flim scripts, screenwriting service, coverage service, screenplay critique service, screenplay format margins, screenplay writing, screenplay format example, free writing tutorials,   script consultant, screenwriting jobs, film production companies